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How to write a love letter to win over a seller

How to write a love letter to win over a seller

By Julie Tramonte

February 2019

If you’re a first-time homebuyer facing stiff competition in having your offer accepted, it may be time to pull out a secret weapon – a love letter to your seller.

Really, a love letter?

Before you scoff, know this: Offer letters have swayed plenty of sellers. In fact, according to Diane Newton, a seasoned real estate agent in Milwaukee, a well-written letter can be the deciding factor for some sellers (providing there isn’t a big dollar discrepancy between offers). She recalls a seller who admitted at the closing that she’d received better offers but was won over by the letter penned by Diane’s buyer. 

If a letter could be the tipping point, it’s important to know how to write a good one. But no need to worry, it’s not as hard as you might think. The letter doesn’t have to be long, it just has to be sincere. And it helps if you follow these suggestions:

Become a person, not a buyer

The whole point of writing a letter is to create a connection between you and the seller so that your offer stands out. Start out by introducing yourself. Paint a relatable picture of yourself – even send a picture. 

Newlyweds Jessica and Brandon included a wedding photo with their letter and provided personal information about themselves, sharing that Jessica was a nurse at a nearby hospital and had grown up in the area.

As you tour a house, try to find something you have in common with the seller. Spot sports memorabilia of your favorite team? Let the seller know you’re a rabid fan. If you see a piano in the living room and you play, share how you hope to fill the house with music, too. Is it obvious children live in the home? Tell the seller you can envision your 2 little girls growing up there and playing in the tree house. 

Feel free to gush – and be specific

Now’s the perfect time to stroke the seller’s ego. Let your sellers know you appreciate their good taste in buying the house, decorating it, maintaining it, remodeling or adding to its appeal throughout the years. 

For instance, Jessica wrote, “I grew up in a house with lots of character and charm like this home and respect you immensely for your efforts to preserve its integrity.” She also complimented the gorgeous crown molding and the “beautiful garden you’ve cultivated.” Who wouldn’t be flattered by that?

Anna and Nathan, another young couple who found success by writing a heartfelt offer letter, told their seller they loved “the open flow from living to dining room, the spacious kitchen, the beautifully updated bathrooms and the 4 bedrooms that will give us plenty of room to start and grow our family.”

Reassure the seller the home will be in good hands

Selling and moving from a beloved home can be an emotional time, so try to be sensitive. Your seller may be comforted to hear how you will cherish and enjoy the home. 

Anna and Nathan wrote, “From the moment we stepped into your beautiful home yesterday afternoon, we knew it was the one for us. We could picture ourselves hosting dinners and game nights with friends and family, cooking together in the kitchen, having a cup of coffee on the front porch, and enjoying walks around the neighborhood.”

You may earn extra points if you tell the seller you’ll honor the integrity of the home – especially if it’s a historical house. Sellers of special homes often view themselves as custodians of the property, so don’t share any plans of knocking down walls. Don’t even mention redecorating the house as it could be insulting and cause them to skip to the next offer.

Most important: Be sincere – and use spellcheck! If you speak from your heart, you may touch your seller’s heart and soon have the keys to your dream home. 

Ahmed mtoor

As first time homebuyers i dnt have experience about this things and also i dnt have the chance to meet the sller yet but if i want to send him a love latter ill do that specially for the cleanest house i ever seen that he salling me and ill thank him for takeong car the house really good and wishing him gd luck

Tara hills

Im ready

marc l

doesn't this violate fair housing practice? I mean, imagine two qualified buyers, one who can write beautiful prose and may have something in common with the seller, the other who's not a writer, maybe even ESL, and can express less in common with the seller due to cultural differences or whatever. now imagine the seller chooses the former because of the letter—unjust, no? our agent just asked us to write one of these for a house that's got multiple offers. don't really feel great about it.

liz keuler - readynest editor

Thanks for your comment, Marc! The article focuses on the positive impact a sincere, heartfelt letter to the seller can have, particularly in a multiple offer scenario. Sellers should be aware that the Fair Housing Act and other laws and regulations prohibit discrimination against homebuyers based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin and that a buyer’s letter should not be used for unlawful discrimination.

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Julie Tramonte is a writer who joined MGIC in 2018. Prior to flying the coop, she wrote for a mattress company, a manufacturer and advertising agencies. She’s obsessed with reading, traveling, tennis and rearranging furniture. Mother of 2 beautiful, adult daughters. Empty nester toying with downsizing. Her guilty pleasures are doughnuts and the Kardashians (don’t tell anyone).